Mr Vain

kenobi-wan-obi:


me every hour

kenobi-wan-obi:

me every hour

(Source: freshprincesubs)

15 April 2014 reblog: freshprincesubs life scared gif will smith


15 April 2014 reblog: touchn2btouched self walk away along for the ride for the ride your future


I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.

— Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar  (via theintentionallife)

(via simplespace)

15 April 2014 reblog: theintentionallife breath heart i am self


normallyanormal:

Never forget.

normallyanormal:

Never forget.

(via lovefailpanda)

12 April 2014 reblog: normallyanormal eternal sunshine of the spotless mind jim carey


Anxiety is not rude. Depression is not selfish. Schizophrenia is not wrong. Eating disorders are not a choice. Obsessive-Compulsive is not crazy. Mental illness isn’t self-centred, anymore than cancer is self-centred. It’s a medical illness.

— (via bewilderedapprehension)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

12 April 2014 reblog: bewilderedapprehension anxiety depression mental illness health


Just how accurate are the memories that we know are true, that we believe in?

The brain abhors a vacuum. Under the best of observation conditions, the absolute best, we only detect, encode and store in our brains bits and pieces of the entire experience in front of us. When it’s important for us to recall what it was that we experienced, we have an incomplete [memory] store, and what happens?

Below awareness, without any kind of motivated processing, the brain fills in information that was not there, not originally stored, from inference, from speculation, from sources of information that came to you, as the observer, after the observation. But it happens without awareness such that you aren’t even cognizant of it occurring. It’s called ‘reconstructed memory.’

All our memories are reconstructed memories. They are the product of what we originally experienced and everything that’s happened afterwards. They’re dynamic. They’re malleable. They’re volatile. And as a result, we all need to remember that the accuracy of our memories is not measured in how vivid they are nor how certain you are that they’re correct.

Are your memories real .. or fake? Neurophysiologist Scott Fraser says you shouldn’t be so sure that what you remember is always what actually happened. Fraser researches how humans remember crimes, and in a powerful talk at TEDxUSC, he suggests that even close-up eyewitnesses to a crime can create “memories” they couldn’t have seen.

Watch the whole talk here» (via tedx)

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

12 April 2014 reblog: tedx memories reconstructed memories self humanity brain


10 April 2014 reblog: nevver over pretending all over it's all over


10 April 2014 reblog: touchn2btouched people change revelation reveal


04.08.14

04.08.14

10 April 2014 04.08.14 pdx or sneeze


04.07.14

10 April 2014 04.07.14 wahkeena falls pdx or marty k10 dan kat bluffs the bluffs multnomah falls waterfall pete nate


(Source: youtube.com, via lovefailpanda)

9 April 2014 reblog: elboburnham gif tall basketball cliche


9 April 2014 humanity self mortality faith zen pencils stanley kubrik


I repeat

9 April 2014 self scared happy believe


03.29.14

03.29.14

5 April 2014 03.29.14 pdx or b*day party dan kat